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A Frugal Sort Of Beauty

Posted: Tue, March 3, 2015
It seems a bit ironic that the Great Depression, aptly described as a dismal, gray period in our history, lent its name to a plethora of rainbow-colored, ornate glassware, but that is exactly what happened. At a time when numerous American manufacturers were folding due to the prevailing economic stress, a revolutionary machine that raised production rates from one item per minute to upwards of thirty items per minute proved to be the saving grace for many glass producers. Just as consumers were forced to tighten their purse strings, mass production translated to lower prices for glassware.
 
Some manufacturers used this new, inexpensive glassware as an incentive to purchase their products. Many of today's seniors may recall the excitement of opening boxes of a variety of products from oatmeal to detergent to find a lovely tumbler or dish inside. Filling stations attracted customers with the pretty glassware while movie theaters and other businesses were known to hand out a piece simply for coming in the door. The glassware could also be purchased through mail order catalogs or at the local "five and dime" for, well, a nickel or a dime. The desire to own a complete table setting of a particular pattern inspired home-makers to become astute shoppers and  avid collectors.
 
The current exhibit at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton, entitled "Frugal Beauty" aims to expand upon the story of and inspire a renewed appreciation for Depression Glass. On display through April 19, the exhibit features many pieces from the large collection of Vi and Darrell Albrecht as well as selected examples provided by others. The glittering colors and charming patterns of the Depression Glass displays will surly lift anyone's spirits at this somewhat gray time of year.
 
An exhibit open house reception is scheduled for Sunday, March 22, from 1:30 - 3:30. Refresh-ments will be served and visitors that day are encouraged to bring in pieces of their own Depression Glass and share the stories associated with them.
 
Admission to the Carnegie Cultural Center is free. It is open Thursdays noon - 6 pm; Saturdays 10 am - 4 pm; Sundays 1 - 4 pm or anytime by appointment. For more information, phone 641.394.2354, email carnegiecc@yahoo.com or visit the Cultural Center's website at www.carnegieculturalcenter.org
 
PHOTO: Darrell (L) and Vi Albrecht pose with some of the pieces included in the Cultural Center
exhibit, "Frugal Beauty."

Lego Club

Posted: Wed, September 3, 2014
The Carnegie Cultural Center
  Invites 3rd, 4th, and 5th Graders to join our new

LEGO CLUB


The first semester LEGO Club will meet nine times, on "early out" Wednesdays: Oct. 1, 8, 15...Nov. 5, 12, 19...& Dec. 3, 10, 17 (If school is canceled or dismissed early due to inclement weather or other special circumstances, the Club will not meet.)

The Club will meet at the Carnegie Cultural Center,
7 N. Water Avenue, after school until 4:30. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Center.

The goals of the Club are to encourage the development of creativity, technical skills and collaboration.

There is no charge or dues to participate in the Club. The Cultural Center will provide all Club materials.

Students must pre-register to participate. Due to space constraints, membership in the Club is limited to 20.

Phone (394-2354), email carnegiecc@yahoo.com, or mail the Carnegie Cultural Center, P.O. Box 243, New Hampton to register. Please submit the following:

Student name:

Parent/Guardian name(s):

Phone number:

Email address:

Emergency contact:

Grade in School:

Teacher:

Student food allergies or restrictions:

(Registration for the second semester Club will be held in January.)

Art Of Our Ancestors

Posted: Wed, September 3, 2014
You probably have a piece of it around your house...a piece of history...a piece of a person...a piece of a story. And whether or not you realize it, it is a piece to be treasured. That piece, of course, is a piece of art work done by someone who came before you that, somehow or another, ended up in your possession. Whether that piece of art holds a place of prominence in your home or is relegated half-forgotten to a closet shelf, now is the time to look at it with appreciative eyes and recall the creative spirit of the person who made it.

Those sentiments are central to the exhibit, "Art of Our Ancestors", on display until Thanksgiving at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton. As one might expect, it is a varied exhibit including folk art...wood utensils, needlework and quilts...as well as accomplished pieces of fine art...paintings, drawings and sculptural pieces. Photographs accompany many of the art works and the theme, materials and form of the pieces help tell the story of the persons who gaze outward from the photos adding a decidedly nostalgic touch to the display.

On Sunday, November 2, the Cultural Center will be hosting a "storytelling" open house from 1:30 - 3:30 pm. During the event, exhibitors will share their stories of the "ancestors" (familial or not!) who created the work on display. Members of the general public are encouraged to bring in additional pieces and share their stories as well. Admission is free and refreshments will be served.

The Carnegie Cultural Center is located at 7 N. Water Ave., New Hampton. It is open Thursdays noon - 6, Saturdays 10am - 4 pm, Sundays 1 - 4 pm or any time by appointment. For more information, contact the Cultural Center by phone at (641) 394-2354, by email at carnegiecc@yahoo.com or visit the website www.carnegieculturalcenter.org.

Photo: Nancy Ryan proudly holds a pastel drawing and pine needle basket by her grandmother, Louise Bailey, of Adel, Iowa.

Art Of The Alumni

Posted: Thu, May 29, 2014
It's a timely exhibit...just in time for Heartland Days and lots of class reunions and it coincides with the retirement of David Prehm, longtime NHHS Art teacher. The exhibit is "timely" in another way as well...it includes art work by NHHS graduates from different time periods. The earliest graduate represented was from the class of 1934 and the most recent from the class of 2013. On display through the end of July at the Carnegie Cultural Center, "Art of the Alumni" is as varied as the artists who created the paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, photographs and fiber arts featured in the expo.
 
Artists represented in the display are (in alphabetical order): Timothy Amundson, Abigail Bartz, Jim Bartz, Erika (Andersen) Billerbeck, Cassandra Bormann, Mindy (Haeflinger) Buckley,  Cinda Dixon, Mitch Erlandson, James Fliger, Roger Fliger, Colleen (Burrichter) Fowle, Jessica Frantzen, Salina (Stapleton) Gavin, Katie (Trewin) Gonzales, James Gossling, Dalton Hackman, Tina (Roethler) Henderson, Julie (Strom) Hendrickson, Sherry (Stiefel) Holland, Natasha Hovey, Amy (Gaffney) Ingalls, Emily Kobliska, Emily Larson, Jeff Palmersheim, Ana Catalina Martinez, Kevin Ovel, Rick Patrie, Baylee Riley, Bill Riley, Katy (Kleinfehn) Riley, Eloise Roberson, Claire Roesler, Becky (Brummond) Schoenfeld, April (Larson) Singewald, Monica Steffen, Lee Stiefel,  Richard Trewin, Sharon  (Rochford) Trewin, and Marc Vorwald. A bio plus high school graduation photo accompanies each artist's work, so the exhibit might also be a good way to get updated on some classmates.
 
An open house reception for the artists, friends, family and the general public will be held on Saturday, June 14 from 11 am to 2 pm at which Dave Prehm will be the guest of honor. Refreshments will be served and everyone is invited to attend.
 
The Carnegie Cultural Center is located at 7 N. Water Ave. in New Hampton. It is open Wed.-Fri. noon - 6; Sat. 10-4; Sun. 1-4 or anytime by appointment. Admission is free. Contact the Cultural Center at (641) 394-2354 or visit  www.carnegieculturalcenter.org for more information.
 
PHOTO: Clockwise starting at the top:
 A painting by Cinda Dixon ('95), pottery by Marc Vorwald ('10), a drawing by Rick Patrie ('67) and a carving by Lee Stiefel ('62) show the variety of styles and media in "Art of the Alumni" on display at the Carnegie Cultural Center.

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center


Through the generosity of Andrew Carnegie, Iowa received 101 libraries, 97 of which still grace towns across the state. Here's something you probably did not know. On November 28, 1898, the first Carnegie Library in the country was dedicated in Fairfield. By 1919, the last year Carnegie grants were awarded, the philanthropist had paid for construction of 1,689 libraries, 101 in Iowa.
Born in Scotland in 1835, the lad migrated with his family to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The quintessential American success story, Carnegie began work as a bobbin boy in a textile mill and ended up founding the precursor to U.S. Steel. His 1901 income in today's dollars would be $450,000,000

On his way up he met Colonel James Anderson who had established a library in the Allegheny region for working boys. "That" said Carnegie, "opened the intellectual wealth of the world to me."
Believing that with wealth came a responsibility to enhance the common good; he constructed two libraries for workers in his steel mill towns. Because most libraries then were in homes or stores, people began to see Carnegie as a way to get their own library. He began receiving so many requests that, eventually, the requesting town had to demonstrate need, provide the site, and promise to support the library services and maintenance annually with taxes. The building design was up to each community.

New Hampton voted on the Carnegie Library and had 515 yeas and 194 nays. On March 30, 1909, Carnegie authorized the building of the library. Carnegie gave $10,000 to New Hampton for the library. The lot cost a total of $1,890. The library cost a total of $10,042.58 for the building, plumbing, heating, and electricity. Carnegie donated about $100 million to libraries at the time New Hampton was building their library.