Sign-up to recieve free news & event informationfrom the Carnegie Cultural Center.

Art Of The Alumni

Posted: Thu, May 29, 2014
It's a timely exhibit...just in time for Heartland Days and lots of class reunions and it coincides with the retirement of David Prehm, longtime NHHS Art teacher. The exhibit is "timely" in another way as well...it includes art work by NHHS graduates from different time periods. The earliest graduate represented was from the class of 1934 and the most recent from the class of 2013. On display through the end of July at the Carnegie Cultural Center, "Art of the Alumni" is as varied as the artists who created the paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, photographs and fiber arts featured in the expo.
 
Artists represented in the display are (in alphabetical order): Timothy Amundson, Abigail Bartz, Jim Bartz, Erika (Andersen) Billerbeck, Cassandra Bormann, Mindy (Haeflinger) Buckley,  Cinda Dixon, Mitch Erlandson, James Fliger, Roger Fliger, Colleen (Burrichter) Fowle, Jessica Frantzen, Salina (Stapleton) Gavin, Katie (Trewin) Gonzales, James Gossling, Dalton Hackman, Tina (Roethler) Henderson, Julie (Strom) Hendrickson, Sherry (Stiefel) Holland, Natasha Hovey, Amy (Gaffney) Ingalls, Emily Kobliska, Emily Larson, Jeff Palmersheim, Ana Catalina Martinez, Kevin Ovel, Rick Patrie, Baylee Riley, Bill Riley, Katy (Kleinfehn) Riley, Eloise Roberson, Claire Roesler, Becky (Brummond) Schoenfeld, April (Larson) Singewald, Monica Steffen, Lee Stiefel,  Richard Trewin, Sharon  (Rochford) Trewin, and Marc Vorwald. A bio plus high school graduation photo accompanies each artist's work, so the exhibit might also be a good way to get updated on some classmates.
 
An open house reception for the artists, friends, family and the general public will be held on Saturday, June 14 from 11 am to 2 pm at which Dave Prehm will be the guest of honor. Refreshments will be served and everyone is invited to attend.
 
The Carnegie Cultural Center is located at 7 N. Water Ave. in New Hampton. It is open Wed.-Fri. noon - 6; Sat. 10-4; Sun. 1-4 or anytime by appointment. Admission is free. Contact the Cultural Center at (641) 394-2354 or visit  www.carnegieculturalcenter.org for more information.
 
PHOTO: Clockwise starting at the top:
 A painting by Cinda Dixon ('95), pottery by Marc Vorwald ('10), a drawing by Rick Patrie ('67) and a carving by Lee Stiefel ('62) show the variety of styles and media in "Art of the Alumni" on display at the Carnegie Cultural Center.

Show Us Your Stuff

Posted: Wed, April 16, 2014
The Carnegie Cultural Center is putting out a call to all local alumni..."Show us your stuff!"  As part of a year's worth of temporary exhibits focusing on the arts, an exhibit featuring work by alumni is scheduled to run from May 17 through August 3. An artist open/house reception is scheduled during Heartland Days on Saturday, June 14 from 11 am to 2 pm. The guest of honor will be retiring NHHS art instructor, Dave Prehm. Since many class reunions are held during the Heartland Days celebration, the open house will provide a great opportunity for former students to connect with Prehm and fellow classmates as well.
 
Art work from alumni of  all classes (not just those from Mr. Prehm's tenure) is being sought for the exhibit. The art work needs to be at the Carnegie Cultural Center, 7 N. Water Avenue, New Hampton, by Wednesday, May 14. Each participant may submit one large piece or several small pieces of art work that they have created at any time following their graduation from high school. A statement including the title of the art work, the artist's name, graduation year, plus a brief statement regarding post-high school art-related pursuits or activities and the alumna's present occupation should accompany the art work.
 
Anyone having contact information for alumni artists is also asked to contact the artists or the Carnegie Cultural Center who will in turn contact the artists.
 
For more details or to pass on contact information call the Carnegie Cultural Center at (641)394-2354, email carnegiecc@yahoo.com or visit www.carnegieculturalcenter.org
 
PHOTO: Dave Prehm (C) is flanked by alumni Alice Bartz  holding a carving created by her brother, James Fliger (NHHS '59), and Jim Bartz (NHHS '90) holding a piece of his own work.

*Please see attached PDF file.



Shake Off Winter with A Little Folk Art Fun

Posted: Tue, March 11, 2014
The Carnegie Cultural Center's 2014 Temporary Exhibits calendar is dedicated to the visual arts. In conjunction with the current exhibit, "Art of the People", which includes examples of folk art from a variety of countries, the Carnegie is inviting area residents of all ages to make a little folk art of their own by taking part in three workshops, "Worry Dolls", "Dream Catchers" or "Coiled Baskets", slated for the weekend of March 29 - 30.
 
The first get-together is scheduled for 10:00 - 11:30a.m.on Saturday, the 29th, and is open to students in grades 1-4 with an adult helper. During the workshop, participants will make several of their very own "Worry Dolls."  Also known as "trouble dolls", worry dolls are traditionally made in Guatemala. When a person, usually a child, cannot sleep due to worrying, they express their concerns to one of these small dolls and then place it under their pillow. According to folklore, the doll assumes the person's worry, permitting him to sleep. The person may then wake without their worry which was taken away by the doll during the night. Some medical centers use them in conjunction with treatment for disease in children.  Parents may involve the child in making the dolls to further increase the psychological benefits of releasing worries. There is no fee for this workshop, but pre-registration is required.
 
Also on Saturday, the 29th, in the 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. time slot, "Dream Catchers" is open to students in grades 5 - 8 and offers a different sort of relief to participants. Native Americans believe that the night air is filled with dreams both good and bad. The dream catcher, when hung over or near one's bed and swinging freely in the air, catches the dreams as they flow by. The good dreams know how to pass through the dream catcher and slip on down to the sleeper.  The bad dreams get tangled in the dream catcher's web and perish with the first light of the new day. It is said that the dream catcher holds the destiny of the future. Again, there is no fee for this workshop, but pre-registration guarantees that sufficient materials will be on hand.
 
Adults and high school students are invited to take part in the "Coiled Baskets" workshop planned for Sunday, March 30 from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Coiling is a basketry technique used by Native Americans all over North America.  All coiled containers begin at the bottom with a flexible coil or core that is wrapped around and on top of itself as it is stitched together.  Coiled baskets from different regions have different styles of coiling depending on the materials used in the core and the type of stitches used to bind the coil together.  Pre-registration and a materials fee of $3 is necessary for this workshop.
 
Pre-register for a workshop by calling the Carnegie Cultural Center at (641) 394-2354 or emailing carnegiecc@yahoo.com and look forward to shaking off the doldrums this long winter has bestowed on us all!
 
PHOTO: Don't Worry...Be Happy! Andi Billerbeck (L) and Katelyn Franzen are happy to show off the worry dolls they crafted at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton.

ART OF THE PEOPLE

Posted: Wed, February 19, 2014
We are all so different, yet we are all the same. While the great "American Melting Pot" has blurred some of the differences, one factor that traditionally distinguished individuals within the broader community was ethnic background. And while ethnicity lends its particular imprint, one thing that draws people of all cultures together is their art. That in itself is something to celebrate.
 
The current exhibit at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton, entitled "Art of the People" celebrates both the differences and similarities found in ethnically influenced art forms. Bold Chinese brushwork calligraphy is seen alongside delicate lettering typical of Norwegian rosemaling; expressive native American kachina dolls dance alongside mute Guatemalan worry dolls; fine, hand-painted Swedish glassware is contrasted with robust Italian Murano glass. Weaving, painting,  printmaking and sculpture are a few of the other art forms featured in this richly-varied exhibit which encourages thoughtful observers to see and appreciate cultural influences in their everyday environment.
 
"Art of the People" will be on display through the end of March. The Carnegie Cultural Center is open Thursdays 12 - 6, Saturdays 10 - 4, Sundays 1-4 or any time by appointment. Admission is free. For more information, contact the Cultural Center at (641) 394-2354 or visit the website at www.carnegieculturalcenter.org   
 
 
Photo: L-R: "Purebreds" all, German, Inge Ott, Filipina, Fely Steffen, and Norwegian, Hazel
Hereid, display art forms that are representative of their ethnic traditions.

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center


Through the generosity of Andrew Carnegie, Iowa received 101 libraries, 97 of which still grace towns across the state. Here's something you probably did not know. On November 28, 1898, the first Carnegie Library in the country was dedicated in Fairfield. By 1919, the last year Carnegie grants were awarded, the philanthropist had paid for construction of 1,689 libraries, 101 in Iowa.
Born in Scotland in 1835, the lad migrated with his family to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The quintessential American success story, Carnegie began work as a bobbin boy in a textile mill and ended up founding the precursor to U.S. Steel. His 1901 income in today's dollars would be $450,000,000

On his way up he met Colonel James Anderson who had established a library in the Allegheny region for working boys. "That" said Carnegie, "opened the intellectual wealth of the world to me."
Believing that with wealth came a responsibility to enhance the common good; he constructed two libraries for workers in his steel mill towns. Because most libraries then were in homes or stores, people began to see Carnegie as a way to get their own library. He began receiving so many requests that, eventually, the requesting town had to demonstrate need, provide the site, and promise to support the library services and maintenance annually with taxes. The building design was up to each community.

New Hampton voted on the Carnegie Library and had 515 yeas and 194 nays. On March 30, 1909, Carnegie authorized the building of the library. Carnegie gave $10,000 to New Hampton for the library. The lot cost a total of $1,890. The library cost a total of $10,042.58 for the building, plumbing, heating, and electricity. Carnegie donated about $100 million to libraries at the time New Hampton was building their library.