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In The Presence Of Angels

Posted: Tue, December 1, 2015
Artifacts for the current Temporary Exhibit at the Carnegie Cultural Center, "In the Presence of Angels" are from the collection of well- known community figures, Marsha and Tim Angel. Most of us know Tim as the City sewage treatment guy. (So, what's angelic about THAT?) Most of us know Marsha as a prolific craftswoman who produces home décor items with a rustic, home-spun appeal. (...which is certainly more angelic than Tim!) Most of us also know that Tim and Marsha are also avid collectors of many things, and with a last name like Angel...well you get the idea.  This fact presents us with a whole new way of knowing Marsha and Tim: they live always in the presence of...are always surrounded by... angels.
 
As children, many of us are introduced to the idea that we each have a guardian angel who serves as a constant, caring custodian of our body and soul.  With that image in mind, it would seem that we all live in the presence of...are surrounded by...angels. In Tim and Marsha's case, they are literally surrounded by angels as the walls of their home are covered with vintage lithographs and prints depicting angels. The pieces on display at the Carnegie are traditional representations of angels leading children away from danger, watching over slumbering little ones, or whisking them away to a safe, heavenly home.  Other pieces are more religious depictions of angels with saints and saviors.
 
Marsha and Tim are sharing their angels with us for the Christmas season and will be on display through the end of December. Stop in and take in the exhibit to experience a gentle respite from the often hectic holiday hoopla.
 
Admission to the Carnegie Cultural Center is free. It is open Thursdays 12-6pm, Saturdays 10am-4 pm, Sundays 1-4pm or anytime by appointment. For more information, contact the Cultural Center by phone at (641)394-2354, by email at carnegiecc@yahoo.com or visit the website www.carnegieculturalcenter.org

Job Announcement: Carnegie Cultural Center Manager

Posted: Fri, October 23, 2015
The Carnegie Cultural Center, New Hampton, IA is seeking applicants for the position of Manager. This entails providing leadership and administration for the Cultural Center organization, its facility, and activities. Presently, this is designed as a three-quarter time position with the possibility of becoming full-time in the future.
 
For a more detailed job description, click on the link below, or contact the Cultural Center by phone at 641.394.2354, or by email at carnegiecc@yahoo.com, or visit the website www.carnegieculturalcenter.org
 
Interested persons should submit a letter of application and resume to: Carnegie Cultural Center, Box 243, New Hampton, Iowa 50659. Applications may also be submitted via email at the address noted above. The application deadline is Dec. 5, 2015.

Cedar Harmony Chorus

Posted: Sat, August 15, 2015
The Cedar Harmony Chorus of Sweet Adelines International (SAI), members of Region 5, will be presenting a concert at the Mikkelson Park Band Shell at 7 pm.  The public is welcome to attend.

Remembering Vietnam

Posted: Mon, August 3, 2015
A snapshot can say a lot. The time, place, event and human emotions captured in the blink of an eye tell a story that is broader than the 3"x 5" or 4" x 6" format of a Kodak print. A collection of such snapshots expands the story exponentially. Such is the nature of "Remembering Vietnam", the current Temporary Exhibit at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton which will be on display through October.

This year we, as a nation, are pausing to commemorate the fortieth anniversary of the end of the Vietnam Conflict. The Carnegie exhibit offers a snapshot of the period by highlighting the diverse experiences of individual Chickasaw County veterans. Seen as a whole, the display presents a bigger picture of one of the most difficult and controversial times in American history. For some, memories from the Vietnam era are fraught with unease and adverse emotions. In commemoration, we are able to accept those perceptions, place them in their proper context, recognize new understandings from the perspective of history and, hopefully, take a step toward healing.

While Carnegie volunteers spent a lot of time in attempting to identify and contact appropriate veterans, there are, no doubt, many who were missed. Anyone still interested in including their information in the exhibit are strongly urged to contact the Cultural Center by phone: 641-394-2354, by email: carnegiecc@yahoo.com or through the website: www.carnegieculturalcenter.org

Everyone is invited to attend an open house reception for "Remembering Vietnam" on Sunday, August 23 from 1:30 - 3:30 to honor area veterans, share stories and enjoy refreshments.


PHOTO: A poster by Marland Johnson that took first prize nationally in a 1952 American Legion Auxiliary contest is pictured next to a jacket belonging to Fredericksburg Vietnam vet, Dennis Shurtleff.

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center


Through the generosity of Andrew Carnegie, Iowa received 101 libraries, 97 of which still grace towns across the state. Here's something you probably did not know. On November 28, 1898, the first Carnegie Library in the country was dedicated in Fairfield. By 1919, the last year Carnegie grants were awarded, the philanthropist had paid for construction of 1,689 libraries, 101 in Iowa.
Born in Scotland in 1835, the lad migrated with his family to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The quintessential American success story, Carnegie began work as a bobbin boy in a textile mill and ended up founding the precursor to U.S. Steel. His 1901 income in today's dollars would be $450,000,000

On his way up he met Colonel James Anderson who had established a library in the Allegheny region for working boys. "That" said Carnegie, "opened the intellectual wealth of the world to me."
Believing that with wealth came a responsibility to enhance the common good; he constructed two libraries for workers in his steel mill towns. Because most libraries then were in homes or stores, people began to see Carnegie as a way to get their own library. He began receiving so many requests that, eventually, the requesting town had to demonstrate need, provide the site, and promise to support the library services and maintenance annually with taxes. The building design was up to each community.

New Hampton voted on the Carnegie Library and had 515 yeas and 194 nays. On March 30, 1909, Carnegie authorized the building of the library. Carnegie gave $10,000 to New Hampton for the library. The lot cost a total of $1,890. The library cost a total of $10,042.58 for the building, plumbing, heating, and electricity. Carnegie donated about $100 million to libraries at the time New Hampton was building their library.