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Artshare: The UI Piano Celebration

Posted: Fri, April 8, 2016

A Tenge Tradition

Posted: Fri, April 8, 2016
What do a "jiggin' lady," a Civil War style cannon, a hog house with residents, WWII airplanes, a tractor round-about and a two-foot-long mouse trap have in common? They were all imaginatively and skillfully fashioned by North Washington master craftsman, Vince Tenge. An exhibit of the pieces listed above plus other examples of Vince's work is currently on display at the Carnegie Cultural Center through early April.

The title of the exhibit, "A Tenge Tradition" partly explains why an otherwise seemingly "normal" man goes to bed in the evening pondering the "burdensome" question, "What should I make tomorrow?" It's in his D.N.A. Vince's father, Edmund Tenge, was well known throughout the area for his love and skill for model making. (One of Edmund's pieces depicting a horse drawn bobsled hauling a load of wood is on long-term loan for display at the Carnegie by his grandson, Kendall Rosauer.) Vince's brother, Rich, is also a proficient hand craftsman. In all three cases, its not just the quantity of their output, it's the quality of the work that makes it noteworthy.

"A Tenge Tradition" is a feast for the eyes as well as the imagination! The folks at the Carnegie also see the exhibit as an eye-opener to the fact that Chickasaw County has it's share of creative, fascinating, talented and unique individuals!

Chickasaw County Historical Coalition

Posted: Thu, March 17, 2016
The Chickasaw County Historical Coalition will be meeting on Thursday, March 22, at 10 am at the Carnegie Cultural Center in New Hampton.  Representatives from the Cemetery Commission, the Genealogical Society, the Old Bradford Museum, and the Carnegie Cultural Center will update the group on current activities and issues and brainstorm ideas for promoting historic preservation efforts in Chickasaw County.  Anyone interested in local or personal history is encouraged to attend and possibly get involved!  For more information, contact the Carnegie Cultural Center by email: carnegiecc@yahoo.com or by phone: (641) 394-2354.

In The Presence Of Angels

Posted: Tue, December 1, 2015
Artifacts for the current Temporary Exhibit at the Carnegie Cultural Center, "In the Presence of Angels" are from the collection of well- known community figures, Marsha and Tim Angel. Most of us know Tim as the City sewage treatment guy. (So, what's angelic about THAT?) Most of us know Marsha as a prolific craftswoman who produces home décor items with a rustic, home-spun appeal. (...which is certainly more angelic than Tim!) Most of us also know that Tim and Marsha are also avid collectors of many things, and with a last name like Angel...well you get the idea.  This fact presents us with a whole new way of knowing Marsha and Tim: they live always in the presence of...are always surrounded by... angels.
 
As children, many of us are introduced to the idea that we each have a guardian angel who serves as a constant, caring custodian of our body and soul.  With that image in mind, it would seem that we all live in the presence of...are surrounded by...angels. In Tim and Marsha's case, they are literally surrounded by angels as the walls of their home are covered with vintage lithographs and prints depicting angels. The pieces on display at the Carnegie are traditional representations of angels leading children away from danger, watching over slumbering little ones, or whisking them away to a safe, heavenly home.  Other pieces are more religious depictions of angels with saints and saviors.
 
Marsha and Tim are sharing their angels with us for the Christmas season and will be on display through the end of December. Stop in and take in the exhibit to experience a gentle respite from the often hectic holiday hoopla.
 
Admission to the Carnegie Cultural Center is free. It is open Thursdays 12-6pm, Saturdays 10am-4 pm, Sundays 1-4pm or anytime by appointment. For more information, contact the Cultural Center by phone at (641)394-2354, by email at carnegiecc@yahoo.com or visit the website www.carnegieculturalcenter.org

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center

The History of the Carnegie Cultural Center


Through the generosity of Andrew Carnegie, Iowa received 101 libraries, 97 of which still grace towns across the state. Here's something you probably did not know. On November 28, 1898, the first Carnegie Library in the country was dedicated in Fairfield. By 1919, the last year Carnegie grants were awarded, the philanthropist had paid for construction of 1,689 libraries, 101 in Iowa.
Born in Scotland in 1835, the lad migrated with his family to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The quintessential American success story, Carnegie began work as a bobbin boy in a textile mill and ended up founding the precursor to U.S. Steel. His 1901 income in today's dollars would be $450,000,000

On his way up he met Colonel James Anderson who had established a library in the Allegheny region for working boys. "That" said Carnegie, "opened the intellectual wealth of the world to me."
Believing that with wealth came a responsibility to enhance the common good; he constructed two libraries for workers in his steel mill towns. Because most libraries then were in homes or stores, people began to see Carnegie as a way to get their own library. He began receiving so many requests that, eventually, the requesting town had to demonstrate need, provide the site, and promise to support the library services and maintenance annually with taxes. The building design was up to each community.

New Hampton voted on the Carnegie Library and had 515 yeas and 194 nays. On March 30, 1909, Carnegie authorized the building of the library. Carnegie gave $10,000 to New Hampton for the library. The lot cost a total of $1,890. The library cost a total of $10,042.58 for the building, plumbing, heating, and electricity. Carnegie donated about $100 million to libraries at the time New Hampton was building their library.